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BATTERY TESTER
SKU: BP-WES1013
$59.95 Inc GST

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PRODUCT SUMMARY:

 

Trade quality

Will do all 12V Tracks Cars & Bikes

Fast 3 second load test

Three simple readings: OK Weak Bad

Currant Voltage display included

 

– Big 3-digit LED-Digital-Display

– Quick indicator (3 LED lights) for Battery Power Status

– Heavy and strong steel housing, chrome plated

– Heavy, safe and strong clamps

– Fixed Current Load – 100 Amps

– Max. capacity of battery to be tested 250Ah / 1000 CCA

 

Details

CHARGING SYSTEM TEST

 

This test measures the output voltage of the alternator/ regulator by checking for under or overcharging, which leads to poor battery performance and short life. If you have not already done so, perform battery load test and proceed if the battery is good.

 

Engine should be at normal operating temperature

 

 

 

   1. Connect tester clamps to battery as described in steps 1 and 2 under Battery Load Test.

 

   2. Turn off all lights and accessories. Operate engine at fast idle (approximately 1500 RPM).

 

   3. Do not operate tester’s load switch.

 

   4. Read digital voltage displayed on the model.

 

   5. Turn on high beam lights and the blower / heater on high. The voltage displayed on the model should not vary more then a decimal point or two.

 

 

 

If the reading stays relatively the same, the charging system is operating correctly. If the reading drops more than that indicated above, the charging system is not operating correctly.

 

Trouble shooting hints

 

Voltage goes low – may be caused by loose belt, defective voltage regulator or defective alternator.

 

Voltage goes high – may be caused by loose or corroded connections or a defective voltage regulator.

 

 

 

STARTER MOTOR TEST

 

This test identifies excessive starter current draw, which makes starting the engine more difficult and shortens battery life. If you have not already done so, perform battery load test and make note of the load test voltage. If the load test indicated a weak of bad battery, this test is not available.

 

 

 

Engine should be at normal operating temperature

 

    1.  Connect tester clamps to battery as described in steps 1 and 2 under Battery Load Test.

 

    2.  Using the table below, find the minimum cranking volts. For example, if load voltage is 11.00, use 9.7 for minimum cranking voltage.

 

    3.  Follow the test vehicle’s manufacturer guidelines for performing a cranking test. Information on how to do this varies from make, model, and manufacturer. Contact the automobile’s manufacturer for specific details.

 

    4.  Crank the engine and note the voltage reading during cranking.

 

    5.  If cranking voltage if step 3 is below the minimum cranking voltage in “starter test table”, the starter current draw is excessive. This may be due to bad connections or a failing starter motor or the battery is too small for the vehicle’s requirements.

 

 

 

STARTER TEST TABLE

 

Load Volts

 

10.2

 

10.4

 

10.6

 

10.8

 

11.0

 

11.2

 

11.4

 

Min. Cranking Volts

 

7.7

 

8.2

 

8.7

 

9.2

 

9.7

 

10.2

 

10.6

 

 

 

Note-for an engine of less than 200 CID (Cubic Inch Displacement ) or 3.6L, use the next minimum cranking volts. For example, a load voltage of 11.00 minimum cranking volts would be 10.2 for an engine with 200 CID/3.6L or less.

 

 

 

HELPFUL HINTS

 

Selecting proper battery size: Use the battery manufacturer’s guide for the recommended CA and

 

Group # for a particular vehicle model. There are two other battery ratings that should be considered depending on the climate where is will be used.

 

    1)  CAA (Cold Cranking Amps)-Discharge load measured in amps that a fully charged battery at 0 oF can deliver for 30 seconds while maintaining it’s voltage above 7.2 volts DC.

 

    2)  RC (Reserve Capacity) – Number of minutes a fully charged battery at 80 ?can be discharged

 

at 25 amps until the voltage drops below 10.5 volts DC.

 

 

 

WHY DOES A LEAD-ADID BATTERY GO BAD

 

Age: Although charging causes the sulfate deposited on the plates to return to the acid, the process is not perfect. A small amount of sulfate insulating residue remains on the plates of the battery (sulfation). With each charge / discharge cycle of the battery this residue accumulates. This process eventually results in diminished electrical conductivity of the plates as well as permanently diluted sulfuric acid and eventually the battery will no longer maintain a charge.

 

FEATURES

 

Your model battery analyzer uses the latest electronic and physical devices available. The model is microprocessor controlled for accuracy and rigorously tested for quality. It is the only hand-held digital battery load tester available on the market.

 

 

 

The model battery analyzer uses spark suppression circuitry to reduce the possibility of sparking during connection to the battery.

 

 

 

A piece of broken equipment means a loss of income for a shop as well as the technician. Electronic Specialties has taken this into consideration and has designed the model with over-voltage detection circuitry to help protect internal components and prevent possible break downs.

 

 

 

The model battery analyzer also includes a manual override. If you have started a load test prematurely or you encounter an emergency situation, you can cancel the load test by reactivating the toggle switch at any time during the test.

 

 

 

The model can also be used as a digital voltmeter. You can use your model to check voltage ranging between +8 to +25 volts DC.

 

 

 

The model will advise “CHG” (for charge), if the battery voltage level is below 12.4 volts and battery test is attempted. At this point, the battery should be fully charged before any load test is attempted. Load testing an already low battery can cause further damage to an already suspect battery.

 

 

 

BATTERY LOAD TEST

 

This test evaluates the battery’s ability to crank an engine. The tester draws current from the battery while measuring its voltage level.

 

The voltage level of a good battery will remain relatively steady under load, but a defective battery will show a rapid loss in voltage.

 

Battery size (CCA rating) and temperature will affect test results. Follow instructions carefully.

 

   1. Turn off engine and accessories.

 

   2. Connect negative (black) clamp to the negative (NEG, N or-) battery post. Connect positive (red)

 

clamp to positive (POS, P or +) battery post. “Rock” clamps back and forth to insure a good

 

electrical connection.

 

   3. With clamps connected, the model will indicate battery’s state of charge. If the state of charge is less than 12.4 volts DC and a load test is attempted, the unit will display “CHG” and the battery should then be recharged before load testing. If recharging does not bring voltage to 12.4 volts DC or above, the battery is defective. If the model does not display any reading, check for loose or reversed clamps, otherwise the battery is either defective or the battery voltage is below 8.5 volts DC.

 

   4. Push the load switch (located on the bottom of the model) all the way to the right and release.

 

   5. After 10 seconds the model will indicate battery condition by illuminating one of the three color LEDs (Light Emitting Diode). A one second beep will also confirm the test is completed. Use the table below to help determine battery condition.

 

   6. 

 

Load tester LED

 

Battery condition

 

Green LED light

 

Battery capacity is OK. Recharge battery to full level.

 

Yellow LED light

 

Battery capacity is not satisfactory. Battery may be either defective or not fully charged. If the battery being tested is not a “maintenance free” type, then check specific gravity to determine which condition exists. If charging does not bring specific gravity to full charge level, then the battery should be replaced. If the battery being tested is a “maintenance free” type, then charge the battery to see if a full charge can be obtained.

 

Red LED light

 

Battery may be defective or very run down and should be replaced.

 

Note: The top portion of the tester will heat up due to load current. Allow the tester to cool for at

 

least one minute between load tests. Do not exceed more then three load tests in a five minutes

 

period.

 

 

 

CHARGING SYSTEM TEST

 

This test measures the output voltage of the alternator/ regulator by checking for under or overcharging, which leads to poor battery performance and short life. If you have not already done so, perform battery load test and proceed if the battery is good.

 

Engine should be at normal operating temperature

 

 

 

   1. Connect tester clamps to battery as described in steps 1 and 2 under Battery Load Test.

 

   2. Turn off all lights and accessories. Operate engine at fast idle (approximately 1500 RPM).

 

   3. Do not operate tester’s load switch.

 

   4. Read digital voltage displayed on the model.

 

   5. Turn on high beam lights and the blower / heater on high. The voltage displayed on the model should not vary more then a decimal point or two.

 

 

 

If the reading stays relatively the same, the charging system is operating correctly. If the reading drops more than that indicated above, the charging system is not operating correctly.

 

Trouble shooting hints

 

Voltage goes low – may be caused by loose belt, defective voltage regulator or defective alternator.

 

Voltage goes high – may be caused by loose or corroded connections or a defective voltage regulator.

 

 

 

STARTER MOTOR TEST

 

This test identifies excessive starter current draw, which makes starting the engine more difficult and shortens battery life. If you have not already done so, perform battery load test and make note of the load test voltage. If the load test indicated a weak of bad battery, this test is not available.

 

 

 

Engine should be at normal operating temperature

 

    1.  Connect tester clamps to battery as described in steps 1 and 2 under Battery Load Test.

 

    2.  Using the table below, find the minimum cranking volts. For example, if load voltage is 11.00, use 9.7 for minimum cranking voltage.

 

    3.  Follow the test vehicle’s manufacturer guidelines for performing a cranking test. Information on how to do this varies from make, model, and manufacturer. Contact the automobile’s manufacturer for specific details.

 

    4.  Crank the engine and note the voltage reading during cranking.

 

    5.  If cranking voltage if step 3 is below the minimum cranking voltage in “starter test table”, the starter current draw is excessive. This may be due to bad connections or a failing starter motor or the battery is too small for the vehicle’s requirements.

 

 

 

STARTER TEST TABLE

 

Load Volts

 

10.2

 

10.4

 

10.6

 

10.8

 

11.0

 

11.2

 

11.4

 

Min. Cranking Volts

 

7.7

 

8.2

 

8.7

 

9.2

 

9.7

 

10.2

 

10.6

 

 

 

Note-for an engine of less than 200 CID (Cubic Inch Displacement ) or 3.6L, use the next minimum cranking volts. For example, a load voltage of 11.00 minimum cranking volts would be 10.2 for an engine with 200 CID/3.6L or less.

 

 

 

HELPFUL HINTS

 

Selecting proper battery size: Use the battery manufacturer’s guide for the recommended CA and

 

Group # for a particular vehicle model. There are two other battery ratings that should be considered depending on the climate where is will be used.

 

    1)  CAA (Cold Cranking Amps)-Discharge load measured in amps that a fully charged battery at 0 oF can deliver for 30 seconds while maintaining it’s voltage above 7.2 volts DC.

 

    2)  RC (Reserve Capacity) – Number of minutes a fully charged battery at 80 ?can be discharged

 

at 25 amps until the voltage drops below 10.5 volts DC.

 

 

 

WHY DOES A LEAD-ADID BATTERY GO BAD

 

Age: Although charging causes the sulfate deposited on the plates to return to the acid, the process is not perfect. A small amount of sulfate insulating residue remains on the plates of the battery (sulfation). With each charge / discharge cycle of the battery this residue accumulates. This process eventually results in diminished electrical conductivity of the plates as well as permanently diluted sulfuric acid and eventually the battery will no longer maintain a charge.

 

Premature failure: A common cause of premature battery failure is loss of electrolyte due to under hood heat or overcharging. Other causes, though less common, are deep discharges (leaving your lights on) using an undersized battery, undercharging, loose alternator belt, or excessive vibration due to loose hold-down clamp(s). Sometimes it isn’t just the sulfation but the occuming mechanical damage that causes premature failure. Shorted cells, open inter-cell connectors, plate erosion and plate expansion are examples of mechanical damage causing premature failure.

 

 

 

WHAT IS A BATTERY’S STATE OF CHARGE

 

A battery’s state of charge is the open circuit or unloaded voltage across the positive and negative terminals. Under unloaded conditions, with no surface charge, a battery displaying 12.7 V or above is considered to be fully changed whereas a battery displaying 10.5 V or below is considered to be fully discharged.

 

 

 

BATTERY FACTS

 

   1. A fully charged battery at 0 ? has only 40% of the cranking power it has at 80 ?.

 

   2. Battery failures are frequently caused by overcharging.

 

   3. A warm battery charges faster then a cold battery.

 

   4. All batteries self discharge. Maintenance-free batteries self discharge slower.

 

   5. A heavy discharge will not damage the internal plates, but an overcharge will.

 

   6. A battery left in a state of discharge will sulfate and lose the capacity to store a charge.

 

   7. Batteries should be stored in the coolest area possible to reduce self-discharge.

 

   8. A fully charged battery freezes at –85 ?, half-charged at -15?, and one quarter charged at +15?.

 

 

 

HELPFUL HINTS

 

Selecting proper battery size: Use the battery manufacturer’s guide for the recommended CA and Group # for a particular vehicle model. There are two other battery ratings that should be considered depending on the climate where it will be used.

 

   3) CCA (Cold Cranking Amps) – Discharge load measured in amps that a fully charged battery at o

 

? can deliver for 30 seconds while maintaining it’s voltage above 7.2 volts DC.

 

   4) RC (Reserve Capacity) – Number of minutes a fully charged battery at 80 ? can be discharged

 

at 25 amps until the voltage drops below 10.5 volts DC.

 

 

 

SPECIFICATIONS

 

 

 

Test load:                            

 

100 amps ± 5% @ 13.2 VDC

 

Relay stuck closed test time:

 

1 second

 

Load operating voltage:

 

Voltmeter range:

 

CCA range:

 

Load testing time:

 

Bad (red LED) time:

 

Weak (yellow LED) indicator:

 

Good (green LED) indicator:

 

Over voltage protection cut-off:

 

Relay closure test delay time:

 

8.5 to 16.0 VDC

 

8.0 to 25.0 VDC

 

150 CCA to 1400 CCA

 

10 seconds nominal

 

< 9.1 VDC

 

9.1 to 10.4 VDC

 

= 10.4 VDC

 

17.0 VDC

 

1 second

 

Load cycle time:

 

Accuracy DC volts:

 

Display:

 

Operating temperature:

 

Storage temperature:

 

Weight:

 

Dimensions:

 

Jaw opening:

 

10 sec on/ min. 60 sec off

 

± 0.1 VDC

 

LED 3 digits

 

0 to 55 ?

 

– 20 to 70?

 

3.5 lbs.

 

11.25″H×4.25″W×2.5″D

 

1.25 inches

 

 

 

DISPLAY ERROR CODES

 

Err – This represents a load relay closure error condition. Having this fault will not allow the model to apply a load to the battery. A continuous beep will also alert you to this error condition.

 

 

OFF – This represents a load relay open error condition. One second after a battery load test is completed, the embedded microprocessor performs a test to verify that the load is removed from the battery. A continuous beep will also alert you to this error condition.

 

 

 

CE Appproved

 

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